All European Careers https://www.all-european-careers.com Hiring and Selecting ICT profiles Wed, 11 Jul 2018 10:57:20 +0200 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.3 120180067 Test Demo https://www.all-european-careers.com/test-demo/ Wed, 11 Jul 2018 10:54:37 +0000 https://www.all-european-careers.com/?p=2881 Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry’s standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into

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Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry’s standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged. It was popularised in the 1960s with the release of Letraset sheets containing Lorem Ipsum passages, and more recently with desktop publishing software like Aldus PageMaker including versions of Lorem Ipsum.

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Aritz Mancha Otano joins All European Careers team https://www.all-european-careers.com/aritz-mancha-otano/ https://www.all-european-careers.com/aritz-mancha-otano/#respond Tue, 28 Feb 2017 09:52:07 +0000 http://all-european-careers.com/?p=1411 All European Careers is pleased to announce that Aritz Mancha Otano joined the All European Careers team to lead our European Commission and Institutions team. Aritz Mancha Otano is an experienced Senior Recruiter specialized on recruitment for the institutions in Belgium, Luxembourg, Switzerland, Netherlands, Italy and Spain. Moving into senior recruitment at All European Careers

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All aritz mancha otanoEuropean Careers is pleased to announce that Aritz Mancha Otano joined the All European Careers team to lead our European Commission and Institutions team.

Aritz Mancha Otano is an experienced Senior Recruiter specialized on recruitment for the institutions in Belgium, Luxembourg, Switzerland, Netherlands, Italy and Spain.

Moving into senior recruitment at All European Careers was a natural progression for Aritz after gaining experience at the European Commission.  Through his experience at the European Commission, Aritz knows very well what the European Commission is looking for and is well placed to guide you through the recruitment process.

Aritz places a focus on open and honest communication.  He spends a lot of time with candidates at all stages of the recruitment process at the Institutions, enabling him to find out as much as possible about their motivations for their next career move. He structures his interviews around the key competencies of the job, enabling him to find the right fit with the right role.

Interested in a position at one of the institutions, please forward your resume at the attention of Aritz to resume@all-european-careers.com

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9 Things Managers Do That Make Good Employees Quit https://www.all-european-careers.com/9-things-managers-do-that-make-good-employees-quit/ https://www.all-european-careers.com/9-things-managers-do-that-make-good-employees-quit/#respond Fri, 18 Nov 2016 11:42:20 +0000 http://www.all-european-careers.com/new/?p=943 It’s pretty incredible how often you hear managers complaining about their best employees leaving, and they really do have something to complain about—few things are as costly and disruptive as good people walking out the door. Managers tend to blame their turnover problems on everything under the sun, while ignoring the crux of the matter:

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It’s pretty incredible how often you hear managers complaining about their best employees leaving, and they really do have something to complain about—few things are as costly and disruptive as good people walking out the door.

Managers tend to blame their turnover problems on everything under the sun, while ignoring the crux of the matter: people don’t leave jobs; they leave managers.

The sad thing is that this can easily be avoided. All that’s required is a new perspective and some extra effort on the manager’s part.

First, we need to understand the nine worst things that managers do that send good people packing.

1. They overwork people.

Nothing burns good employees out quite like overworking them. It’s so tempting to work your best people hard that managers frequently fall into this trap. Overworking good employees is perplexing; they feel as if they’re being punished for great performance. Overworking employees is also counterproductive. New research from Stanford shows that productivity per hour declines sharply when the workweek exceeds 50 hours, and productivity drops off so much after 55 hours that you don’t get anything out of working more.

If you must increase how much work your talented employees are doing, you’d better increase their status as well. Talented employees will take on a bigger workload, but they won’t stay if their job suffocates them in the process. Raises, promotions, and title-changes are all acceptable ways to increase workload. If you simply increase workload because people are talented, without changing a thing, they will seek another job that gives them what they deserve.

2. They don’t recognize contributions and reward good work.

It’s easy to underestimate the power of a pat on the back, especially with top performers who are intrinsically motivated. Everyone likes kudos, none more so than those who work hard and give their all. Managers need to communicate with their people to find out what makes them feel good (for some, it’s a raise; for others, it’s public recognition) and then to reward them for a job well done. With top performers, this will happen often if you’re doing it right.

3. They don’t care about their employees.

More than half of people who leave their jobs do so because of their relationship with their boss. Smart companies make certain their managers know how to balance being professional with being human. These are the bosses who celebrate an employee’s success, empathize with those going through hard times, and challenge people, even when it hurts. Bosses who fail to really care will always have high turnover rates. It’s impossible to work for someone eight-plus hours a day when they aren’t personally involved and don’t care about anything other than your production yield.

4. They don’t honor their commitments.

Making promises to people places you on the fine line that lies between making them very happy and watching them walk out the door. When you uphold a commitment, you grow in the eyes of your employees because you prove yourself to be trustworthy and honorable (two very important qualities in a boss). But when you disregard your commitment, you come across as slimy, uncaring, and disrespectful. After all, if the boss doesn’t honor his or her commitments, why should everyone else?

5. They hire and promote the wrong people.

Good, hard-working employees want to work with like-minded professionals. When managers don’t do the hard work of hiring good people, it’s a major demotivator for those stuck working alongside them. Promoting the wrong people is even worse. When you work your tail off only to get passed over for a promotion that’s given to someone who glad-handed their way to the top, it’s a massive insult. No wonder it makes good people leave.

6. They don’t let people pursue their passions.

Talented employees are passionate. Providing opportunities for them to pursue their passions improves their productivity and job satisfaction. But many managers want people to work within a little box. These managers fear that productivity will decline if they let people expand their focus and pursue their passions. Studies show that people who are able to pursue their passions at work experience flow, a euphoric state of mind that is five times more productive than the norm.

7. They fail to develop people’s skills.

When managers are asked about their inattention to employees, they try to excuse themselves, using words such as “trust,” “autonomy,” and “empowerment.” This is complete nonsense. Good managers manage, no matter how talented the employee. They pay attention and are constantly listening and giving feedback.

Management may have a beginning, but it certainly has no end. When you have a talented employee, it’s up to you to keep finding areas in which they can improve to expand their skill set. The most talented employees want feedback—more so than the less talented ones—and it’s your job to keep it coming. If you don’t, your best people will grow bored and complacent.

8. They fail to engage their creativity.

The most talented employees seek to improve everything they touch. If you take away their ability to change and improve things because you’re only comfortable with the status quo, this makes them hate their jobs. Caging up this innate desire to create not only limits them, it limits you.

9. They fail to challenge people intellectually.

Great bosses challenge their employees to accomplish things that seem inconceivable at first. Instead of setting mundane, incremental goals, they set lofty goals that push people out of their comfort zones. Then, good managers do everything in their power to help them succeed. When talented and intelligent people find themselves doing things that are too easy or boring, they seek other jobs that will challenge their intellects.

Bringing it all together.

If you want your best people to stay, you need to think carefully about how you treat them. While good employees are as tough as nails, their talent gives them an abundance of options. You need to make them want to work for you.

Source : www.entrepreneur.com
Author : Travis Bradberry

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4 Myths Debunked About Employees Working Remotely https://www.all-european-careers.com/4-myths-debunked-about-employees-working-remotely/ https://www.all-european-careers.com/4-myths-debunked-about-employees-working-remotely/#respond Fri, 18 Nov 2016 11:37:04 +0000 http://www.all-european-careers.com/new/?p=939 Let’s face it: The world has gone mobile. By the year 2016, it is estimated that nearly 2 billion people will have smartphones and currently, about 53 percent of all email is opened on a mobile device.So why are you still in a traditional brick-and-mortar office? If you think operating remotely isn’t for you, we dare to

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Let’s face it: The world has gone mobile. By the year 2016, it is estimated that nearly 2 billion people will have smartphones and currently, about 53 percent of all email is opened on a mobile device.So why are you still in a traditional brick-and-mortar office? If you think operating remotely isn’t for you, we dare to tell you why you are wrong.

1. Myth: If I don’t see my team members face to face, I can’t trust that they are doing their job.

Reality: If you are hiring people you need to keep tabs on all day long to ensure productivity, you aren’t hiring the right people, or perhaps you need to rethink your management style.

Management isn’t about physically watching your team members work, it’s about monitoring their overall productivity and ensuring the goals of their project and the business are being met. You don’t need to look over their shoulder to properly assess their performance.

In a virtual environment, we rely heavily on our project-management software to track projects day to day, as well as detailed weekly reports. We use Skype and GotoMeeting when we need some “in-person” time but also encourage the team to regularly reach out to others so no one feels like they are operating on an “island by themselves!” This has cultivated an environment of trust, respect and ultimately, productivity.

Myth: Team members will be distracted and not actually work during working hours.

Reality: It’s all about who and how you hire. If you don’t have a detailed, in-depth hiring process, we admit this is a valid concern. But it’s one that can be dismissed if you employ the right techniques to find the best people for the job.

Team members who can show proven success with a remote position are ideal, as you know they can handle working in a virtual environment. It’s not for everyone, so it’s up to you and your HR team to flesh out the right candidates. Successful virtual team members stick to the clear working hours you set for them and feel comfortable asking for time off or flexing their hours when necessary. They aren’t working poolside or answering emails in the carpool line. They are committed to their job — and that will ultimately show in their overall productivity.

Myth: Our customers won’t trust us without a physical location.

Reality: The world really is changing and with the advent of technology, consumers don’t need to walk into a storefront to believe you are real. Without a physical location, you just need to find more creative ways to earn your prospective customers’ trust.

If you are operating virtually, your website is the face of your business. You need to ensure that it accurately reflects your brand and products/services and includes plenty of credibility-increasing content.  Include testimonials from happy customers that highlight the best parts of your business and create a page with compelling and interesting biographies on each team member. Getting great press coverage? That should be easy for visitors to find on your site, as it’s the ultimate nod to your business when others are talking about it! Ensure your content is compelling, professional and error free and you will earn your customers’ trust. (It goes without saying that of course, you still need to provide an outstanding service or product to retain that confidence!)

Myth: We provide a better customer experience when everyone is one place.

Reality: In fact, the opposite very well may be true. With one physical location, you need to hire team members from the surrounding geographical area. This forces you to choose from that selection of candidates only. What if the best customer-service manager for your company lives two hours from your office? By operating virtually, you can find the best of the best, regardless of their physical location. This ultimately benefits your customers: The better your business runs, the better the experience for your customers.

It’s hard for some business owners to imagine a world without an office but there are many advantages to doing so. As with any decision, it will take careful planning and spot-on execution. But f you are committed to success at all costs, there are many compelling reasons to shake up the traditional approach and switch over to a virtual setup.

Source : www.entrepreneur.com
Author : David and Carrie McKeegan

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Why, and How, to Hire for Potential Over Experience https://www.all-european-careers.com/why-and-how-to-hire-for-potential-over-experience/ https://www.all-european-careers.com/why-and-how-to-hire-for-potential-over-experience/#respond Fri, 18 Nov 2016 11:35:09 +0000 http://www.all-european-careers.com/new/?p=937 When volleying between two candidates, what qualifications determine the final cut? Every hiring manager has interviewed Paul and Sam, but not every Paul and Sam has been hired for the same reason. Meet Paul. Paul is a one of the final candidates for a marketing coordinator position at a budding tech startup. He has several

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When volleying between two candidates, what qualifications determine the final cut? Every hiring manager has interviewed Paul and Sam, but not every Paul and Sam has been hired for the same reason.

Meet Paul. Paul is a one of the final candidates for a marketing coordinator position at a budding tech startup. He has several years of experience and notable success working as a marketing coordinator for two big name companies.

Now meet the other finalist, Sam. Sam has less experience than Paul working on big projects for big name companies in the marketing field, but she has demonstrated passion and leadership qualities both at work and in her personal life. She’s involved in several marketing associations and has her own marketing-related blog.

It’s only natural to want to go with Paul because of his extensive experience. However, while Sam has less experience working as a marketing coordinator, her leadership qualities are apparent in her involvement in several marketing associations and projects in and out of the workplace.

Paul, on the other hand, has served as a marketing coordinator for several years at more than one company and is applying for yet another entry to mid-level position as a marketing coordinator. Paul may have the experience, but Sam has the potential.

For startup roles especially, leadership potential trumps experience. Startups need candidates who want to learn and grow with the company more than they need candidates who may perform well, but have little desire for growth. Because high-potential (HiPo) talent is largely determined by an employee’s aspirations, employers can’t simply develop potential — they have to find it. Here’s how:

What to look for.

A good majority of resumes focus on verbs and highlight what candidates managed, created, developed, conducted, etc. While these words are informative, they’re not differentiating. What matters more is the quantitative results of those efforts. Candidates who describe — in numbers, preferably — how the work they did benefitted the company are great examples of HiPo talent.

In addition to looking for quantitative results, read between the lines and take note of how candidates describe their experiences. There is a lot employers can learn about a candidate’s passion and ambition from the adjectives and adverbs he or she uses to describe the work he or she did.

What to ask.

A resume can only tell employers so much about a candidate’s potential. Fortunately, the interview provides the perfect time to get down to the nitty gritty. To discover if candidates will bring passion, ambition and possibility to the organization, try asking the following types of questions:

Company-specific questions such as, “Which of our values resonates with you the most?” can help employers determine if the candidate did his or her homework on the company.

Strategic questions such as, “If hired, what would your game plan be for your first three months in this position?” can help identify HiPo talent by focusing on the candidate’s goals and ambitions.

Industry-related questions such as, “Where do you go to find the latest news and information on [blank]?” elicit honest, unplanned answers and can tell employers about the candidate’s level of interest in his or her respective industry.

Personal experience questions such as, “Can you describe a time when you took responsibility to make something happen?” provide employers with real-world evidence of candidate potential.

What to listen for.

A job interview is a two-way street. Just as employers aim to learn about the candidate, the candidate should use this time to learn more about the company and the position he or she is being interviewed for. The questions a candidate asks during an interview can be very telling of his or her job fit and future potential. As the famous French philosopher Voltaire once said, “Judge a man by his questions, rather than by his answers.”

Curiosity is a huge indicator of HiPo talent, so watch out for candidates who don’t ask any questions or rely on run-of-the-mill questions they feel obligated to ask. Candidates who are full of potential are likely to be full of questions. Unprompted questions that go beyond the job position and refer to the company mission, vision and strategic direction are a good sign of HiPo talent.

How to test.

Last, but certainly not least, go beyond the discussion of candidate skills and abilities and have the candidate demonstrate his or her talent. Assessment tests, presentations and other similar evaluations are essential to assessing candidate job fit and future potential.

But whereas skills can be taught, potential cannot. Assessment tests alone won’t reveal candidate ambition.

Consider extending an invitation to an industry-related professional development event or even a weekly team meeting. Genuinely interested candidates who are full of ambition and potential will jump at the opportunity to get involved and further develop his or her skills. Best of all, these professional settings give employers a chance to seecandidate potential in action.

Source : www.entrepreneur.com
Author : Andre Lavoie

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Should you tell interviewers the truth — or what they want to hear? https://www.all-european-careers.com/should-you-tell-interviewers-the-truth-or-what-they-want-to-hear/ https://www.all-european-careers.com/should-you-tell-interviewers-the-truth-or-what-they-want-to-hear/#respond Thu, 17 Nov 2016 08:30:23 +0000 http://www.all-european-careers.com/new/?p=622   When it comes to interviews, job seekers often fear off-the-wall questions, awkward interviewers, or accidentally showing up late. But there’s another stressor that can be just as crippling: You’re asked a question, and you know your answer — but you also know it’s not the answer the interviewer wants to hear. Here’s an example:

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interview

 

When it comes to interviews, job seekers often fear off-the-wall questions, awkward interviewers, or accidentally showing up late.

But there’s another stressor that can be just as crippling: You’re asked a question, and you know your answer — but you also know it’s not the answer the interviewer wants to hear.

Here’s an example: You show up to the scheduled meeting, and the hiring manager leads you through an open-concept workspace to his office. He turns to you and asks, “So, what do you think of shared office spaces?”

The “right” answer — the one he obviously wants to hear — is, “I think they’re great! I love collaborating and interacting with my co-workers all day, every day.”

But what if the response that actually rings true for you is the very opposite — that you like working independently and you’d prefer to shut yourself in a nice, quiet office andfocus on your work without constant distraction?

You want the job, of course, but you also don’t want to flat-out lie and land yourself in a position that isn’t a great fit for you. To figure out where to draw the line, keep these four tips in mind.

1. Realize you don’t actually know what the interviewer wants to hear

If candidates always knew what their interviewers wanted to hear, there probably wouldn’t be so many people who respond to the infamous “What’s your biggest weakness?” with “Perfectionism.” Because as many hiring managers will tell you, that’s exactly what they don’t want to hear.

In many cases, interviewers want you to be candid and honest about your shortcomings. Yes, they are looking for particular qualities and experience, but they also want to know that you’re a person, not a robot. For example, a hiring manager who asks you to recount a mistake you made truly wants to hear about your blunder (and how you learned from it, of course) — not that you’ve had a miraculously mistake-free career.

You may think your answer isn’t what the right one — but it may actually be the breath of fresh air that lands you the job.

2. Rephrase if possible

In some cases, you may be able to be honest with your response while still putting yourself in a good light.

For example, maybe your interviewer asks you how you handle stress. The honest answer? It usually sends you into a complete emotional breakdown — you burst into tearsor start snapping at everyone who comes within 10 feet of your cubicle.

But, that’s probably not going to inspire much confidence in the hiring manager. So, consider how you can rephrase in an honest but more positive way by focusing on how you are working to improve in that particular area.

“When I face a stressful situation, there are times when I let the pressure get to me. However, I’ve realized that what really helps is breaking down tasks into more manageable pieces and focusing on just one portion at a time. I’ve found that when I approach a stressful situation that way, I’m able to complete the task more efficiently and with a level head.”

3. Ask more questions

When you assume you know exactly what the interviewer is looking for, you can box yourself in to the thinking that right answer is a black or white issue. However, by asking a few clarifying questions, you can speak honestly while still positioning yourself in a good light.

Consider the example of the open-concept workspace. Assuming you don’t want to work alone all the time, you could answer the question with, “I enjoy collaborating with my co-workers, but when I really need to focus, I prefer to work independently, in a quiet area. I see you have a pretty open office here — are there any quiet spaces employees can go to get away from distractions?”

You’re being completely honest, while showing your flexibility — and most importantly, you’re digging in to figure out if the role is truly right for you. Because just as the company is evaluating you, you’re also evaluating the business and the open position. For your future career satisfaction, it’s important to avoid just aiming to please, but to dig in to figure out of the role is actually a good fit for you. Which brings me to:

4. Know your deal breakers

In the end, you have to know what’s truly a deal breaker for you and let that be your guide, rather than focusing on how to answer the question in a way that appeals to the interviewer.

For instance, if you want a role that requires absolutely no contact with customers, then an interviewer asking, “How do you handle angry customer calls?” is likely a sign that you won’t be a good fit for the position.

On the other hand, maybe you don’t handle stress well — but it’s something you’re working on, and you know that most challenging, career-advancing positions are going toencompass some level of stress. In that situation, it may not be a complete deal breaker, and would be worth it to formulate an answer that is both honest and appealing to your interviewer.

Of course you want your interview answers to be music to the hiring manager’s ears. But you also don’t want that to get in the way of landing a job you love. Strike the right balance — while still being honest — and you’ll be on track for a career that’s a perfect fit for you.

Source : www.mashable.com
Author : Katie Douthwaite Wolf

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